Category: 90s rap groups

Largest debut hip hop album

Okay, when songs like this sound so chill and happy, it’s hard to notice they’re actually in minor at first. Could it maybe be the ninth chords? I mean, these chords are thick right from the get-go, so for type names I’m gonna have to go by the bass notes and piano chunks to make i  iiº ♭III  ♭VI  v —, and then also a V after that iiº. But again, there are so many sevenths, ninths, and elevenths boo’d up here combined with the fizzy timbre of the synth that it’s hard to tell what exactly to call all these exotic ice cream flavors.

Unfortunately, this means they’ve swung to the other extreme: They’ve become very reluctant and skeptical about lending to anyone that falls outside “the norm.” Working with a team that knows the ins and outs of the music industry can change that.

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90s gangsta rap

Following some standard doubling of the main guitar riff during the song’s introductory chorus, Jameson erupts with some root-octave slapping in the verse. He follows this with a couple high pops up on the neck and a slide down to the relative minor. The pulsation of F# with the fifth below it and alternating with the A just above it generates a funkier feel than you’d ever expect from a hard rock song with a simple three-note guitar hook. The sequence is repeated several times in the verse and, in spite of all the other cool riffs in this song, leaves you wanting to hear more.

So far, we’ve kept to pretty mainstream pop tunes, but when we start to move away from those, things can get murky pretty quickly. For instance, while verses and choruses might be easy to recognize in a big pop anthem, how they function in an electronic dance song might not be as clear. Or how would you describe the form of something like “A Day in the Life” by The Beatles? It’s basically two entirely separate songs smashed together, so there’s no obvious “verse” or “chorus” section. Same thing with Travis Scott’s “Sicko Mode,” but for three songs’ worth!

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Female hip hop artists 2019

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For another change of pace, you could amp up the electronics and work with a guest DJ to make an electro-dance version of your original song. If you’ve got fans who don’t speak English (or you’d like to have some), try translating your lyrics and creating a foreign-language version of your song. You could also re-record your song live at your favorite venue, and release it as a live single.

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